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maelje

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Message Posted: Mar 17, 2011 2:06:49 PM

I drive a Mercury Montego Premier, 2006. With this car, I really notice that if tires are not inflated properly, my mileage suffers. But in general, I think people are way too lax in paying attention to this. I have seen my mileage drop as much as 5 to 6 mpg from having a low tire. Anyone else see anything that dramatic?
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Aug 7, 2013 1:25:24 PM

The tire manufacturer has no idea how their tire will be used, so the auto manufacturer's suggestion is the place to start. However, the car maker wants to sell cars, and the buyers typically like a soft ride. This means that you can almost always increase the pressure by a few PSI with no problems at all, gaining better mileage and handling.
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fet297
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Message Posted: Aug 7, 2013 1:16:07 PM

no
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HotRod10
Champion Author Wyoming

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Message Posted: Aug 7, 2013 12:37:00 PM

"every tire manufacturer recommends the tire inflation pressure recommended by the AUTO MANUFACTURER."

Of course they do. They're not going to take on the liability of recommending something else. That doesn't mean it'll get you the best handling or mileage.
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jack4141
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Message Posted: Jul 29, 2013 6:38:11 AM

I check mind every other week to made sure they are correct.
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Jul 29, 2013 6:33:37 AM

betasniper, shoulder wear indicates low tire pressure.
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Maintroll
Champion Author Lexington

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Message Posted: Jul 28, 2013 11:34:44 PM

My car has a low tire warning light on the dash.
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betasniper
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Message Posted: Jul 28, 2013 2:46:58 AM

I fill to a few psi under max. The recommended pressure resulted in shoulder wear on the old set of tires.
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gvan
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Message Posted: Jul 27, 2013 2:04:16 PM

"keep mine pumped up to sidewall max pressure. Handles great and wears better."

Try this. Google every tire manufacturer and see what they say about tire inflation on there websites. I'll save you the time.....every tire manufacturer recommends the tire inflation pressure recommended by the AUTO MANUFACTURER.
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33gort33
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Message Posted: Jul 27, 2013 7:17:28 AM

36 front 34 rear

Costco does nitrogen and 6-8000 mile rotations WITH rebalancing everytime you go in.

That's why i buy @ Costco...
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 26, 2013 5:16:39 PM

"HotRod10, I just wanted to let it be known that Nitrogen tire inflation is not a scam. But while it works, the advantages are small, and you can get most of them through proper inflation with dry air and regular maintenance."

I don't believe I ever called it a scam. The rest of your statement falls right in line with my views. Where were we disagreeing, again?
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 26, 2013 2:29:13 PM

"You can safely increase that a bit for better mileage, but keep in mind that this comes with decreased traction."

Actually, even at several psi over, you won't usually lose any contact area (you can check by driving over a piece of white paper on a flat surface). At higher pressures, you may start to lose contact area, but unless there's water or loose material on the roadway, the amount of traction doesn't change (total friction = total force X coefficient of friction, regardless of contact area). That holds true up to the point where you're losing rubber.

"The Explorer had handling issues that were addressed by specifying a low rear tire pressure."

Well, in the case of the Explorer, the lower tire pressures helped a little bit by making the handling and lateral "give" just squishy enough to barely pass the specific test they used. The hard cornering performance of most vehicles improves with higher tire pressures.
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Guelphite2013
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Message Posted: Jul 26, 2013 10:01:03 AM

Yeah ive seen an improvement of around 1km/l00L.
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Jul 26, 2013 9:56:54 AM

HotRod10, I just wanted to let it be known that Nitrogen tire inflation is not a scam. But while it works, the advantages are small, and you can get most of them through proper inflation with dry air and regular maintenance. Go with what you want.

Nitrogen top-offs are free, and I just stop in every 6 months or so when I'm in the area, so it's no real effort.

I have more problem with those who use the sidewall inflation number. It is correct that the auto manufacturer's specification is often set for a soft ride for better sales. You can safely increase that a bit for better mileage, but keep in mind that this comes with decreased traction. Go too far and safety is compromised. Remember that the tire manufacturer doesn't know what car their tire will be mounted on, so that sidewall number is a never exceed number, and depending on the car may not be safe.

Remember the Ford Explorer and Firestone tire problems a few years ago? The Explorer had handling issues that were addressed by specifying a low rear tire pressure. Unfortunately a combination of that low pressure and high vehicle weight with cargo caused excessive heat buildup in the rear tires, causing blowouts and deaths. Firestone took much of the blame, but the real problem was Ford setting specs to levels that were inappropriate for the vehicle. Sometimes tire pressure can be very critical.

[Edited by: ldheinz at 7/26/2013 10:59:19 AM EST]
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Floridaman2013
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Message Posted: Jul 25, 2013 4:13:24 PM

keep mine pumped up to sidewall max pressure. Handles great and wears better.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 25, 2013 12:59:20 PM

Houckster, it seems the nitrogen makes sense for you, for the bikes especially. The additional cost for nitrogen I'm guessing it's not even drop in the bucket compared to the rest of what you have into your bikes.

ldheinz, I'm not trying to talk you out of your choice; for you, it's worth the cost for the convenience of not having to check your tires (or going to the tire shop more often for them to do it).

I just wanted other readers to see both sides and get a realistic view about the benefits of nitrogen inflation for passenger tires. Without more substantial evidence of an increase in tire life, I would not pay to have my tires inflated with nitrogen. I also like to run the pressure in my tires 4-6psi over the vehicle's recommended pressures for better mileage, and the shops around here will only inflate to what's on the door panel.
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RRBC
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Message Posted: Jul 24, 2013 5:51:03 PM

That reminds me to check on my Nitrogen filled tires
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Chazzer
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Message Posted: Jul 24, 2013 2:44:31 PM

The reason the OEM guys have that (low) recommended tire pressure is for a more comfortable ride. I keep mine at the max pressure on the sidewall of the tire. Increased my MPG by 4.0 MPG!
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RedWings44
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Message Posted: Jul 24, 2013 2:19:35 PM

Nothing quite that dramatic but there is a definite difference. There was about a 4 MPG difference between my tires being at 32 vs 35 on the freeway. I drive a 1998 Ford Mustang (V6) with Cooper Cobra Radial G/T tires.
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Jul 24, 2013 9:11:06 AM

I have a 3HP compressor in my garage, but I use nitrogen in my car tires to save maintenance time. Bicycle tires, not so much. I just top them off when they need it.

A shop nitrogen generator can cost $5000-$8000, but Harbor Freight has one for $1000. For occasional usage, a tank makes more sense.

I would think that with thinner rubber and higher pressure, the difference between air and nitrogen inflation would be more obvious in bicycle tires.

For me the tire shop where I get my nitrogen is only 4 miles away. I just top them off every 6 months or so when I'm near there anyway.
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FrankLee1
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 11:47:56 PM

Some of my bike tires require airing up- oh- every week or two, while others seemingly go for months without needing to be aired up. The one thing they all have in common is they are only aired up with regular air.
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Houckster
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 6:35:21 PM

The tires I use are inflated to 120 PSI and very thin tubes are used to keep wheel weight down.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 5:40:05 PM

"As for bicycle tires, I lose about 8-10 lbs PSI per day with air..."

I think you might need some Slime or something. Mine might lose that 8-10 psi in a couple of weeks; any more than that I start looking for a leak. I top off the kids' bike tires about once a month; maybe it's that much drier here?
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Houckster
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 4:20:58 PM

HOTROD1 writes: If you say so...I can't see how going out and buying nitrogen tanks would be cheaper or more convenient for me than grabbing the hose from my air compressor for all my bikes, vehicles, etc
_____
Yes, you can just use your air compressor for all your needs and you won't spend any money. And while I had to pay for the equipment to get started, I save a lot of time not inflating car tires, both car and bike, and that is worthwhile to me because these are not my favorite thing to do. Over time, the cost becomes negligible as a nitrogen refill costs $20 and lasts a year or two.

And if one happens to think nitrogen is better than air then . . .

For my car tires, it's a 28 mile round trip to get my tires topped off. With the kit I have I save about $6-7 in gas and I don't have to wait to have the work done which, including driving time, is about 2-3 hours.

As for bicycle tires, I lose about 8-10 lbs PSI per day with air and I lose about 3-4 tubes per year due to pinhole leaks that I believe come from the corrosive effects of the humid air we have here in Atlanta. And I only have to top off the tires every 2nd or 3rd day, usually every third day.

It all comes down to what each of us consider to be a worthy expense. I value reduced tire pressure maintenance and increased tire reliability (for bicycles at least) while it seems that topping off tires isn't a big deal to you.

The central argument our comments revolve is how COST and BENEFIT effective nitrogen is and I think we have to broaden the definition of what is cost and benefit. In a pure dollars and cents analysis, it would be hard to beat air but when subjective values like convenience, satisfaction and reliability are considered, the scales tip in nitrogen's favor for people like me.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 3:16:02 PM

"So there's considerable convenience and cost advantages for me."

If you say so...I can't see how going out and buying nitrogen tanks would be cheaper or more convenient for me than grabbing the hose from my air compressor for all my bikes, vehicles, etc.
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Houckster
Champion Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 2:05:49 PM

HOTROD10 wrote (in response to purchasing nitrogen that's 99% pure): I guess the tire shops could do that as well, but it would be considerably more expensive than the separators, for the volume they use.
_____
Who knows? But I would have to basically agree with you since tire shops must have considered buying the nitrogen from a company like NexAir versus buying a separator and apparently the separator was the best choice.

As to the quality of the nitrogen with regard to purity (% of nitrogen and lack of moisture), it appears that tire shops can have 99.9% nitrogen for their customers if they wish: Terra Universal Separators

For me though, having my own system allows me to inflate not only my Ranger's tires but also my bike tires. So there's considerable convenience and cost advantages for me.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 1:27:52 PM

"...I can buy nitrogen that's 99.9% pure."

I guess the tire shops could do that as well, but it would be considerably more expensive than the separators, for the volume they use.

[Edited by: HotRod10 at 7/23/2013 2:28:22 PM EST]
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Houckster
Champion Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 1:17:24 PM

HOTROD10 writes: That's all you're doing with Nitrogen inflation also. If you read the literature, it's only 95% Nitrogen they put in, and the target is 93% Nitrogen in the tire.
_____
Following up on that comment: One of the advantages of having my own nitrogen inflation system is that I can buy nitrogen that's 99.9% pure. Thus I can eliminate oxygen altogether.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 12:13:35 PM

"...if you wish to trade $5/tire for...somewhat shorter tire life"

How much shorter tire life? I haven't seen anything that indicates whether the increase in tire life is even measurable within the typical life of the tire. If the degradation is not significant enough to cause failure of the tire before it's replaced anyway, then does it really matter?

"...if you wish to trade $5/tire for doing regular testing and refills...Also, since most people don't do proper maintenance on their cars, nitrogen inflation is good for the general public."

regular testing and refills are a good idea regardless of what the tires are inflated with. The UC-Davis study you referenced noted:

"However, the same study did question the true real-world “reduced leakage” benefit of nitrogen inflation for passenger tires because in these tires much of the leakage is associated with losses around the rim flange and at the valve itself rather than permeating through the tire rubber (Baldwin et al, 2004)."

With Nitrogen or air, people who don't check their tires and keep them properly inflated will likely see shorter tire life, reduced gas mileage, poorer handling, etc. It may actually be worse for the "general public" because Nitrogen gives them the false sense of security that they don't need to check the tires.

[Edited by: HotRod10 at 7/23/2013 1:24:05 PM EST]
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 11:23:44 AM

ricebike - "hotrod, those truck tires should be checked more frequently if you're a CDL or commercial driver... it's part of your pre-trip/post-trip inspection process "

Yes, and they are. The UC Davis study cited found that fleet vehicles are typically better maintained than individually owned vehicles.

HotRod10, if you wish to trade $5/tire for doing regular testing and refills of your tires as well as a somewhat shorter tire life, you are welcome to. My time has value, though. Also, since most people don't do proper maintenance on their cars, nitrogen inflation is good for the general public.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 10:10:38 AM

"Why can't we both be happy with our choices and let it go at that?"

We could, but then others would not have the benefit of seeing the pros and cons, which is a major reason I engage in these discussions. I probably won't convince you to give up what you're doing (and I wasn't trying to), and I'm not convinced that there's any advantage for me to pay for nitrogen for my situation. I see why you use it, and others who are in similar circumstances may also want to use it. It's just not for me until I see more convincing evidence that it increases the longevity of the tires I use.
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 23, 2013 8:40:51 AM

ricebike, truck tires probably should be checked more often but the point in the article was that they aren't checked often enough in the real world (the writer mentions 6 months the tires are out on the road, where they have to rely on the driver to check them, which doesn't always happen). That's why the writer recommended nitrogen for the truck tires. My point is even if it is cost-effective for truck tires, doesn't mean it is for passenger tires that are properly maintained.
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ricebike
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Message Posted: Jul 22, 2013 11:33:15 PM

hotrod, those truck tires should be checked more frequently if you're a CDL or commercial driver... it's part of your pre-trip/post-trip inspection process
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Houckster
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Message Posted: Jul 22, 2013 9:13:32 PM

HOTROD10 writes: So, if I use dry air and keep my tires properly inflated (which even the fleet managers cannot always do), the advantages of Nitrogen all but disappear.
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Except for the convenience factor because to maintain the pressure of your tires using dry air, you'll have to add air 3-4 times more than people who use nitrogen do. Maybe that's not important to you but I hate checking tire pressure so the less I have to do it the better.

Frankly, at this point, the discussion is becoming more and more pointless. I prefer nitrogen for my reasons and you think nitrogen is a waste of money for your reasons. Why can't we both be happy with our choices and let it go at that?

[Edited by: Houckster at 7/22/2013 10:19:41 PM EST]
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 22, 2013 4:38:15 PM

"The PDF is about tires, not just truck tires. Other than being larger, truck tires are made like car tires, and everything there applies to both."

...except for the two major things they mentioned and I referenced - truck tires get recapped (sometime multiple times) and they may go 6 months without an inspection or pressure check.

"Ford research shows that nitrogen slows and even stops tire aging."

Yes that was very enlightening. Their conclusion: "Nonetheless, it is perhaps a fair assumption to say that there would be some improvement in tire durability if nitrogen was used as the inflation media, but it is too soon to speculate as to how much of an improvement it would be."

Nice try, but it doesn't answer my question of whether there is a significant difference in tires after 10 years with Nitrogen vs. air. The main thing that study looked at was oxidation, and from the UC-Davis study you cited was this little tidbit: "Tire defects, tire separation, or tire oxidation are rarely the cause of replacing tires."

You quoted the line out of the UC-Davis study: "Private users are estimated to experience an increase in average tire life of about 11% with the use of nitrogen inflation systems. Based on our estimations for public vehicle fleets,however, the comparable increase in tire longevity was about 5%."

You neglected to quote the rest of the paragraph: "This lesser impact of nitrogen inflation for fleets is on account of the better maintenance practices, which result less oxidation related premature tire replacements and reduced average under-inflation."

So, the reason for the decrease in the advantage of Nitrogen for fleet vehicles was due to better maintenance techniques (using dry air for inflation) and keeping proper inflation pressures. So, if I use dry air and keep my tires properly inflated (which even the fleet managers cannot always do), the advantages of Nitrogen all but disappear.
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timewalker
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Message Posted: Jul 19, 2013 5:07:12 PM

I don't know about quite that much, but yes. About 4%
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ldheinz
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Message Posted: Jul 19, 2013 3:54:43 PM

Hotrod10 - "If you read the literature, it's only 95% Nitrogen they put in, and the target is 93% Nitrogen in the tire."

Which is still a lot less oxygen and a LOT less moisture than with air inflation.

mybigtruck - " Aging--unless we're living on the moon, filling a tire with pure nitrogen doesn't do anything to the fact that there's oxygen outside of the tire here on Earth. "

But since the pressure is on the inside of the tire, that's the gas that permeates through the tire rubber.

mybigtruck - "I have all 4 of mine set to 75psi. Factory spec is 65 in front and 80 in the back. Max listed on the sidewall is 80psi."

Please lower the pressure to closer to the vehicle manufacturer's specification. The sidewall pressure is a never to exceed when unloaded number. It's a safety issue.

Hotrod10 - " I haven't seen any research that would indicate that running with air instead of Nitrogen will cause a noticeable increase in degradation even over 10 years. "

Now you have. Ford research shows that nitrogen slows and even stops tire aging.

FrankLee1 - "ldheinz never gets tired of being wrong. "

I'll let you know if it happens, as I'm sure you wouldn't be able to recognize it. And apparently you never tire of being unable to support anything that you say.

ldheinz - "Brigestone/Firestone has an excellent PDF explaining many of the advantages of Nitrogen tire inflation."

Hotrod10 - "Nice paper; only one problem, it's about truck tires."

The PDF is about tires, not just truck tires. Other than being larger, truck tires are made like car tires, and everything there applies to both.

According to the UC Davis study:

"Private users are estimated to experience an increase in average tire life of about 11% with the use of nitrogen inflation systems. Based on our estimations for public vehicle fleets, however, the comparable increase in tire longevity was about 5%."
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HotRod10
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Message Posted: Jul 19, 2013 10:14:30 AM

"You will never eliminate oxygen although the percentage of oxygen will decrease."

That's all you're doing with Nitrogen inflation also. If you read the literature, it's only 95% Nitrogen they put in, and the target is 93% Nitrogen in the tire.

"My tires are 10 years old and still have another 20-30K available."

Well, then you're one of those rare people who drives their vehicle less than 5000 miles a year. Last I heard, 12k to 15k was more the norm. Besides, I haven't seen any research that would indicate that running with air instead of Nitrogen will cause a noticeable increase in degradation even over 10 years. If you have to pay to fill up with Nitrogen once a year for that 10 years, it still wouldn't be cost-effective.
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Houckster
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Message Posted: Jul 18, 2013 7:40:59 PM

MYBIGTRUCK: Air is already 78% nitrogen. If I'm at a Costco, I'll occasionally top off my tires with their free nitrogen, but there's no difference that I can notice using it. I won't go out of my way to make a nitrogen trip to Costco either. I'm not racing my 8200lb truck around the track.

ME: Nitrogen provides no advantage in rolling resistance to a tire filled to an equal air. The nitrogen advantage is in convenience because the tire pressure is maintained for longer periods because nitrogen bleeds through the tire tube at a much slower rate. The gas mileage advantage is made because tires maintain pressure longer which is important for people who check tire pressures once every millenium. Also, temperature has less of an effect on tire pressure when the tire has nitrogen.

MYBIGTRUCK: Aging--unless we're living on the moon, filling a tire with pure nitrogen doesn't do anything to the fact that there's oxygen outside of the tire here on Earth. By the time my tires have started dry rot and started to have other maladies, it's usually time to get new ones.

ME: Not necessarily. My tires are 10 years old and still have another 20-30K available. Nitrogen is important to reduce moisture inside the tire to protect the tube as is a UVA/UVB coating to the outside of the tire.

MYBIGTRUCK: Technically speaking, since oxygen leaks through the tires faster than nitrogen, eventually we'll have nothing but nitrogen in the tires as we keep filling it with air.

ME: Nope. Every time you aid air, you add oxygen. You will never eliminate oxygen although the percentage of oxygen will decrease.
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Houckster
Champion Author Atlanta

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Message Posted: Jul 18, 2013 7:26:10 PM

Taking care of the tires that came on your new ride is important because the OEMs get their pick of the most efficient rolling tires available. It's unlikely that replacement tires available to the consumer will have the same low rolling friction coefficient that the OEM's tires had.
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OilerFan
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Message Posted: Jul 18, 2013 6:35:58 AM

another reason to pay attention to this, is that proper inflation means that the tires will wear better and it'll be longer before you have to buy new tires.
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mybigtruck
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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 11:53:02 PM

I have all 4 of mine set to 75psi. Factory spec is 65 in front and 80 in the back. Max listed on the sidewall is 80psi.

Try riding a bike with slightly deflated tires vs one pumped up to the max. Your legs will answer the question!

As for nitrogen goes, I wouldn't pay for it.

Air is already 78% nitrogen. If I'm at a Costco, I'll occasionally top off my tires with their free nitrogen, but there's no difference that I can notice using it. I won't go out of my way to make a nitrogen trip to Costco either. I'm not racing my 8200lb truck around the track.

Aging--unless we're living on the moon, filling a tire with pure nitrogen doesn't do anything to the fact that there's oxygen outside of the tire here on Earth. By the time my tires have started dry rot and started to have other maladies, it's usually time to get new ones.

Technically speaking, since oxygen leaks through the tires faster than nitrogen, eventually we'll have nothing but nitrogen in the tires as we keep filling it with air.



[Edited by: mybigtruck at 7/18/2013 12:59:57 AM EST]
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carinthuist
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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 11:17:15 PM

Yes
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giwan
Champion Author Michigan

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 2:54:07 PM

Keep them up
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HotRod10
Champion Author Wyoming

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 1:30:04 PM

"I keep my tires inflated to the max recommended by the manufacturer."

Uh, that's not a recommendation, it's the maximum safe pressure the tire can withstand.

[Edited by: HotRod10 at 7/17/2013 2:30:27 PM EST]
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Chazzer
Champion Author Nevada

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 12:38:11 PM

Yes! I keep my tires inflated to the max recommended by the manufacturer.
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FrankLee1
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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 12:29:15 PM

ldheinz never gets tired of being wrong.
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HotRod10
Champion Author Wyoming

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 12:18:46 PM

"...makes nitrogen the driest inflation gas available, far drier than the driest air available from any compressor."

Maybe slightly drier than if you shell out the 10 bucks for one of those fancy filter-driers for your air compressor, but the amount of moisture that gets through the $10 filter is insignificant. Of course, the effects of the "normal" amount of moisture are also insignificant for normal driving conditions.

"Brigestone/Firestone has an excellent PDF explaining many of the advantages of Nitrogen tire inflation."

Nice paper; only one problem, it's about truck tires. From the paper - "Is nitrogen inflation cost-effective? That’s going to depend on your situation. If your trailers go out and don’t come back for six months or more, being able to keep consistent inflation pressures may greatly lengthen tread life. Some tests have shown increases of up to 26 percent. Less rubber aging and tire cord rust could also yield a higher proportion of retreadable casings – and casings that can survive more retread cycles."

So, unless you're going 6 months between pressure checks or retreading your tires, it appears the benefits probably don't justify the cost.

"Tire Rack lists several good reasons to use nitrogen inflation and advise it at the price that I paid ($5/tire)."

Well, not exactly. This is what they actually said:

"Is it worth it? If you go someplace that provides free nitrogen with new tires, why not? Additionally we’ve seen some service providers offering reasonable prices of about $5 per tire (including periodic adjustments for the life of the tire) to a less reasonable $10 per tire (with additional costs for subsequent pressure adjustments) or more as part of a service contract, which we believe exceeds the value of nitrogen’s benefit.

Rather than pay extra for nitrogen, most drivers would be better off buying an accurate tire pressure gauge and checking and adjusting their tire pressures regularly."

I guess if you read just the first paragraph I quoted, and assumed that they meant "reasonable" on a cost/benefit basis as opposed to the shop's cost vs. what they charge being reasonable, then you could come away with that conclusion. However, the next paragraph would indicate that unless it's less than the cost of a tire gauge (about $2), it not worth it. They also said this:

"•Nitrogen is non-corrosive and will reduce oxidation and rust due to the absence of oxygen and moisture. This will help minimize wheel corrosion to promote better bead sealing. Tires that are used routinely will be replaced long before any life benefit would be received by using Nitrogen."

[Edited by: HotRod10 at 7/17/2013 1:20:08 PM EST]
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FrankLee1
All-Star Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 11:59:49 AM

I was counting on people reading the link. Racers, aircraft, people that don't maintain their vehicles well, etc., are listed as possibly benefitting from nitrogen fills. People that know how to use a tire gauge and frequently use it anyway will not see a benefit. If your A.D.D. permits, look at it again and read the last paragraph.
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dassfg
Champion Author Fort Worth

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 11:08:18 AM

tire pressure does make a difference
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ldheinz
Champion Author Chicago

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 10:36:51 AM

FrankLee1, were you counting on people to not read your link? Because Tire Rack lists several good reasons to use nitrogen inflation and advise it at the price that I paid ($5/tire).

Brigestone/Firestone has an excellent PDF explaining many of the advantages of Nitrogen tire inflation.

One of the best examples of the advantages of Nitrogen tire inflation is the Ford accelerated aging tire test. To prematurely age tires, Ford doubles the oxygen in the tires, which causes the tires to age at over 10x their normal rate. Doesn't it seem reasonable that lowering the oxygen by a factor of 5 or more would help some?

As far as moisture goes, the process of removing the oxygen makes nitrogen the driest inflation gas available, far drier than the driest air available from any compressor.

[Edited by: ldheinz at 7/17/2013 11:39:06 AM EST]
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FrankLee1
All-Star Author Minnesota

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Message Posted: Jul 17, 2013 10:12:20 AM

I trust the Tire Rack boys to know the truth about Nitrogen: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=191

For most of us, regular use of a pressure gauge and airing up with plain ol' air is the best.

Regarding moisture, when I air up at service stations I press the button on the air hose and watch for moisture in the pressurized air as it shoots out; if there is visible moisture I blast it out before airing the tires.
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